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winterizing method

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stevef
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winterizing method

Post by stevef » Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:11 pm

I've seen some people fog the engine by spraying fogging oil into the intake, or using a 50:1 two stroke oil gas mix before shutting down for the season. The two stroke mix seems easier, and probably coats better. Anybody have experience or have any more info on the practical differences?
Last edited by stevef on Tue Feb 17, 2015 6:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jhnmdahl
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Re: winterizing method

Post by jhnmdahl » Tue Feb 17, 2015 6:02 pm

The Cobalt manual isn't very helpful in this regard, but for volvo at least, they recommend both. The shop manual states in part:

Off-Season Storage
There are nine steps that must be completed for Off-Season Storage Preparation. When gasoline engines are removed from service for long periods (2 months or more), it is important that they are correctly stored or protected (internally). Today’s gasoline blends are not as stable as in the past and consideration must be given if the fuel will not be used within a short time or if the engine is being placed in storage. Failure to properly stabilize the fuel can damage fuel system components and is not considered as warrantable a defect that would be covered and repaired under the limited express warranty. Boat manufacturers should follow the gasoline storage mixture sectionfor testing prior to shipment. Fuel stabilizer can be purchased locally at most marine supply stores.

Limited Use
If the vessels fuel within the tank(s) will not be consumed within a 30-day period from the time of filling, a gasoline fuel stabilizer must be added as per the manufacturer’s instructions. This will help prevent the fuel from breaking down and causing reduced engine performance fuel system clogging or damage from uncontrolled combustion.

Storage
If the boat is being placed into storage, a gasoline fuel stabilizer must be added to the tank(s) as per the manufacturers instructions. The amount of stabilizer required is determined by the quantity of fuel and the length of time it will be placed in storage. The maximum period that fuel can be stabilized is six months due to limitations of the stabilizers and fuels.
WARNING! Any fuel leakage should be corrected immediately to prevent possible fire and/or explosion.
NOTICE! Do not run engine out of fuel or run the electric fuel pumps dry more than 20 seconds. Running the electric fuel pumps dry will cause fuel pump damage.

Step 1. Prepare a storage mixture
In addition to stabilization of the fuel, it is highly desirable to have the valves and cylinders coated with a light film of oil previously accomplished through fogging. Today’s fuel injection manifolds are designed with a complex air channel design that will not allow the traditional fogging oils to be injected past the throttle plate while running. The oil will get stuck in the plenum and never reach the cylinders. Together with the stabilizer, two-cycle motor oil can be added to a fuel mixture for stabilization purposes.
• Using an outboard motor six-gallon fuel tank, add two-cycle motor oil at a ratio of 50:1 (one pint to 6 gallons) and stabilizer at one ounce per gallon (unless stated otherwise on the manufacturers label). Mix well.
• Disconnect boat fuel line at engine fuel pump. Attach the storage mixture fuel tank.
• Connect a suitable engine flush device if the boat is not in the water.
• Run the engine on the storage mixture for approximately 5 minutes at 1500 RPM. This will ensure that all fuel system and internal engine components are thoroughly protected. Do not operate the engine above 1500 RPM as the water pump demand may exceed the supply, damaging the pump.
• Reduce the engine speed to idle and stop the engine.
• Reconnect the fuel fitting and check for fuel leaks.

Step 2. Change Motor Oil and Oil Filter:
• Engine should first be operated under load until oil is thoroughly warmed up. If oil is allowed to warm up before draining, a more complete draining will be accomplished. In addition, accumulated impurities will be held in suspension by the oil and be removed during draining operation.
• Remove motor oil by siphoning it out of oil withdrawal tube. Follow the procedure under Draining and Filling the Engine Crankcase.
• Install a new oil filter and fill crankcase with recommended oil.
NOTICE! Sterndrive must be submerged in water or an accessory flushing adaptor must be used while operating engine. When using a flushing adaptor, remove propeller before starting engine to prevent accidental contact with rotating propeller.
• With sterndrive in full down position, run engine at a fast idle for a few minutes to distribute clean oil through engine.
• Shut off engine and check oil level. Check oil filter gasket for leaks. Add oil if necessary to bring oil level up to, but not over, the full mark.

Step 3. Change Drive Lubricant:
Drain and refill with fresh GL-5 Synthetic Gear Lubricant or Mobilube 1 SHC Fully Synthetic SAE 75W-90 (meeting or exceeding MIL-L-2105C or D, API GL-4 or 5) gear lubricant. Refer to Vertical Drive Service Manual.

Step 4. Fog Engine:
• Warm up engine to ensure fuel conditioner is throughout fuel system. Use 1/2 pint (0.24 liter) of Fogging Oil 12 oz. (355ml) spray can to fog engine.
• Remove flame arrester from carburetor. Following instructions on container, bring engine up to a fast idle and slowly pour or spray 2/3 of fogging oil into carburetor. Keep engine running while pouring fogging oil into carburetor throat.

Step 5. Drain Cooling System
When draining the cooling system, raise or lower the bow of the boat to position the engine in a level horizontal plane. This will provide complete drainage of the engine block and manifolds. If the bow is higher or lower that the stern, some water may be trapped in the engine block or manifolds. Improper or incomplete draining may result in freeze damage to the engine, manifolds, sterndrive, or other components. Freeze damage is not covered under Volvo Penta’s Limited Warranty.

Front
1. Disable ignition system See Engine Compression Testing on page 5.
2. Remove inlet and outlet hoses from raw water pump and crank the engine with starter 1-2 revolutions.
3. Reconnect ignition system.
Starboard
4. Disconnect and drain large hose at circulation pump Port
5. Remove exhaust manifold drain plug. Clear hole with a small wire to ensure complete drainage.
6. Remove cap from engine flush hose and lower hose into bilge.
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stevef
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Re: winterizing method

Post by stevef » Wed Feb 18, 2015 2:09 pm

That sucks. I was hoping not to have to fog. Thanks for the info.

Steve

jhnmdahl
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Re: winterizing method

Post by jhnmdahl » Thu Sep 10, 2015 1:45 pm

This topic is again becoming seasonally relevant. The description for step 1 implies that you should either do step 1 or step 5, depending on whether your boat is fuel injected, and should run off the 50:1 mix if you have a fuel injected boat while doing the oil change as well (so as not to burn off the oil deposited in step 1). Or, one could perform Step 1 OR Step 4 as step 4, or in conjunction with changing the motor oil in Step 2 if that's the last time you'll be running the engine.

Also, it looks like the newer Volvos (2003+) can be run with a garden hose connected to the engine flush port rather than using muffs, but various opinions on other volvo boards suggest not putting the boat in gear or revving it much beyond 1000-1500 rpm with the flush port as the only cooling.

John
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